Blog: Microsoft Office

I came across a strange issue with one customer's multiple laptops where they could not print from Office programs or a test page. PDF documents printed through Adobe Reader were working.

While troubleshooting, I ran a capture of file access procedures through Microsoft's Process Monitor application. What I found in the capture was an access denied event to C:\Temp on the laptop.

I edited the permissions on C:\Temp by adding Everybody modify access to the folder and was able to print normally after that. This fixed the issue on the rest of the laptops also.


 

I've increasingly had issues getting Excel to open other Excel files if I already had one open. I noticed it happened every time I was working in one of my spreadsheets that contained macros. However after some research, I discovered that Microsoft has intentionally designed this so that if Excel thinks you are editing a cell, it will not allow you to open any other Excel files (even if they are unrelated).
Although there isn't really a true solution, if you hit enter, or simply get out of the cell as if you're editing it, or hit save, you should be able to open other files.

 

If you have ever been annoyed with Office AutoCorrect changing words like "VMware" to "Vmware", you'll be relieved to know there is help for you. In any Office application, go to File->Options->Proofing-> AutoCorrect Options->Exceptions->INitial CAps. There you can add the string in question (ex. "VMw") to the list to stop Office apps from constantly correcting your typing "errors".

 

After installing each Windows 10 creator's update, I get the following error message when I try to click on any link in any email message or click on a table of contents link in a Word doc:

It's not an entirely bad thing to have email links require a copy and paste but it's a real problem with other links like the Table of Contents in a long Word document.

There is a KB article at https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/kb/310049 that discusses this issue. The solution for Windows 10 is to find a system that doesn't have the problem and export a registry key then import it into the offending system. The key it references gets deleted each time a new creator's update is installed.

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Software\Classes\htmlfile\shell\open\command

Then you export the subkey to a file, copy the file to the system having the problem and import it into that system's registry (either by double clicking the .reg file or importing it via regedit). There is a last verification step to verify the String (Default) value of "HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT \.html" key is "htmlfile".

That was several steps it took to make my system less secure. It's usually the other way around!

 


 

After installing Windows 10 and Office on a new laptop, I started getting the following error message when I tried to click on any link in any email message or click on a table of contents link in a Word doc:

"Your organization's policies are preventing us from completing this action for you. For more info, please contact your help desk"

While it's not an entirely bad thing to have email links require a copy and paste, it's a real problem with other links like the Table of Contents in a long Word document.

There is a KB article at https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/kb/310049 that discusses this issue. The solution for Windows 10 is to find a system that doesn't have the problem and export a registry key then import it into the offending system. The key it references was missing from my system.

The steps that worked for me were to find a Windows 10 system that didn't have the problem, run regedit and locate the following subkey:

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Software\Classes\htmlfile\shell\open\command

Then you export the subkey to a file, copy the file to the system having the problem and import it into that system's registry (either by double clicking the .reg file or importing it via regedit).

There is a last verification step to verify the String (Default) value of "HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT \.html" key is "htmlfile".


 

Recently I worked on a desktop system that was having issues connecting to WSUS and installing patches. This was a Windows 10 system (upgraded from Win 8.1) with Office 2016 (upgraded from Office 2013). Every time that I opened the Windows Update app, it listed several Office 2013 updates that couldn’t install. You could press the Retry Now button and it would run for a minute or two, but always fail with a non-specific and non-helpful error.

After running through troubleshooting steps of resetting the Windows Update agent, I finally started looking at the Office 2013 aspect. I decided to uninstall whatever 2013 components were still there and reinstall, if necessary. I loaded Programs and Features and Office 2013 was not listed.

I found a Microsoft utility to forcibly uninstall Office 2013/2016 products (link) and ran it on this PC. On the first run (and subsequent reboot), Office 2016 was removed, but 2013 was still detected by the Windows Update agent. On the second run (and subsequent reboot), Windows Update installed all of its normal patches without the Office patches listed.

I reinstalled Office 2016 and was able to bring the computer up to date. It really appears as if the 2016 upgrade didn’t fully remove all of the 2013 components as a part of the upgrade.

 

 


 

I am constantly right-clicking the Outlook icon in the taskbar and choosing what I want from the jump list. However, after upgrading to Outlook 2016, this feature became unavailable. I followed the steps below to get the jump list working again.

  1. Unpin the Outlook 2016 icon from the taskbar
  2. Exit Outlook 2016
  3. Delete the HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Office\16.0\Outlook\LastUILanguage registry key
  4. Start Outlook 2016, and then re-pin the icon

 

Users of Microsoft Office 2013 32-bit may experience the following behavior on an RDS server. Each time a user starts Outlook 2013, a window is briefly shown with the message: "Configuring Microsoft Office 64-bit Components 2013." The message appears for restricted users and administrators alike, but there's no apparent effect that Outlook is impaired in functionality. [more]

Solution: To resolve the issue, install the Windows Search Service role. As soon as this role is installed and its services running, the message will no longer appear. A reboot is not required.

Cause: The components it configures are necessary to link the search indexer to the Outlook's data stores (OTS and PST). Because the Search Service is not installed, this part of the configuration process of Outlook fails, and therefore it is re-attempted each time.

Notes: Both XenApp and RDS best practices suggest to disable the Windows Search Service. In fact, the Citrix PVS Target Device Optimizer disables the service when it is run on the server. After installing the service, you might consider setting the service to disabled. This does not cause the message above to reappear; however, when the service is disabled, Outlook will display a message, "The Windows Search Engine is currently disable. Outlook will not be able to provide fast search results using the Instant Search functionality unless this service is running. Do not show this message again."